Career Development Category Archives - General Assembly Blog | Page 4

Filling the Gap Between Learning & Engagement

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The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a rapid and forced transformation of many businesses. Plans that companies previously anticipated rolling out over many years have been decided and implemented in weeks.  

Amid this rapid change where many are scrambling to adapt, leaders should ask themselves what other “five-year plans” should fastrack to keep pace with these critical business plans. One of the plans that companies should evaluate is talent development: how can businesses develop strategic plans to meet the needs of their rapidly evolving businesses?   

Creating talent development work isn’t as easy as providing online learning to employees. Our Marketing Standards board members met recently and uncovered an unexpected commonality. While all of them are making learning available to their employees, the primary area for improvement on their employee engagement surveys continues to be upskilling. This revelation brought on a layered conversation about the common challenges employers face when it comes to engaging employees in training and development — especially when these pieces of training are online. So, what’s causing the disconnect between desire and action on upskilling employees, and most importantly, what can leaders do about it?   

Understanding the Disconnect

Upskilling is urgent for employers — especially for newer professionals who aren’t going to be satisfied in their jobs if there are no learning (or advancement) opportunities. Employees don’t merely want a job; they want to work for companies they can learn from and grow within; employees wish to build careers.  

In a Deloitte survey, 90% of employees said their organizations were redesigning jobs. The World Economic Forum reported that more than half of all its employees would require reskilling or upskilling to address the digital skills gaps driven by changing job requirements over the next three years.  

For many reasons like these, our board members agree that it’s an employer’s responsibility to make learning available and an integrated part of the employee experience.  

So, what’s getting in the way of learning — from the employee perspective?  

Two big factors are time and incentive. Many employees feel like there’s not enough time during the workday to take the training accessible to them. Others don’t prioritize upskilling because although they want new and updated skills, there is no extrinsic motivator for learning them. One of the clearest opportunities for extrinsic motivation often isn’t clearly connected to training: it’s the idea that training and skills are requisite expectations for the job or performance. The right jobs motivate all of us.  

Possible Solutions

Providing employees with upskilling opportunities signals to them that they are valued and that they have a future within their workplace organization. However, offering a training program isn’t enough — the implementation of these programs must be intentional, structured, and relevant. During our conversation, board members came up with tips that can help companies foster a learning-positive workplace. These tips include:  

1. Partner With Leadership to Allocate Time During the Workday

Big roadblocks employees face: blocking time to make learning important and creating company-wide time blocks, like “No Meetings Fridays,” to provide designated time for employee upskilling. Making these time blocks company-wide is critical. If some teams aren’t participating in it, they’ll throw a meeting on the calendar that conflicts with the learning time. At that point, you’ve lost the consistent open time and original initiative purpose you’re trying to create for your team.   

2. Extrinsic Incentives: Compelling Rewards

Extrinsic incentives are tangible motivators that can encourage employees to take an upskilling training course. Offering incentives gives employees a clear prize at the end of their experience, plus an added incentive to complete learning by a particular due date. This specific incentive is a nice touch from board member Gretchen Saegh (CMO of L’Oréal USA), who plans on rewarding “the best re-scorer” of the CM1 assessment with being “CMO for the day.” These empowering incentives give employees a sense of purpose, a structured career path, and long-term vision, giving them valuable real-world experiences and advice that can be difficult to get elsewhere.  

Extrinsic Incentives: Executive Messaging on Expectations

Source: https://learning.linkedin.com/resources/workplace-learning-report

When employees see their managers endorsing upskilling, and also see the executive team pushing for the same thing, it speaks volumes about the value of upskilling within that organization and the expectations around completing tasks and initiatives surrounding it. The bottom line is that upskilling gains immediate credibility when employees see it supported by leadership. A message from the CEO and executive team is imperative when it comes to setting the tone for a company, as a message from “the top” can have a ripple effect throughout the organization.   

Getting employees to translate the desire-to-action key values of online learning is particularly pertinent as more employers look for efficient and effective ways to train their employees remotely via online training providers. It’s a new world, and there’s no magic bullet, hidden secrets, and there are certainly no shortcuts. The right online training is thoughtful and methodical: it considers human behavior, personal motivations, and leadership alignment + support to get online training to occur and resonate for employees — from entry-level positions to the C-suite.  

Finally, there’s the process of trial and error. Although initiatives often start with the strongest and best of intentions, the most successful training results adapt and fluctuate over time. No plan is flawless right out of the gate — however well-planned or well-intended.  

Learning is always a journey.

To learn more about how General Assembly can help guide your company’s talent transformation, check out our enterprise marketing solutions.

General Assembly + CUNY

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These are unprecedented times for the world and for New York City. Many things have changed, but our goal hasn’t: We’re committed to your success and here to provide guidance toward the right jobs for you. 

Thank you for indicating interest in CUNY’s upskilling coursework in partnership with General Assembly, and congratulations on taking time to invest in yourself!

Register for the course by filling out this Google Form. An email that invites you to join the course will be sent to you within 3-5 business days.

You can get started below:

Data Analytics

GA’s online Data Analysis On Demand program is designed to get you started on the path towards becoming a stronger, analytical operator. Many industries require data skills, including product management, marketing, finance, and operations across job titles such as data analyst, business intelligence, data scientist, data engineer, and data architect. Data jobs have doubled since 2012, and salary ranges are $40–80K for data analysts and $60–120K for data scientists. 

This program will familiarize you with the key systems that allow you to make sense of data for every type of industry or job and visually express the findings to your stakeholders. It provides a comprehensive foundation to equip you with the context, process, and tools to identify and communicate data-driven insights using Excel and SQL. Students will leave the course with a business case and analysis for a client; they will learn to extract data using SQL, clean and analyze in Excel, and create the visuals and argument for their conclusions.

Learn more about Data Analytics On Demand at General Assembly.

Digital Marketing

GA’s online Digital Marketing On Demand program is designed to help you learn and implement the most in-demand digital marketing practices of the 21st century. The ability to analyze the vast amounts of data generated by digital marketing activities, and translate that analysis into digital marketing strategies and tactics, will be among the most important skills for marketers in the next decade. Digital marketing jobs have more than doubled in the last five years alone, and the average starting salary for these positions is $76,000. 

This program will teach you the foundational skills across five focus areas: customer insight, creative and content, marketing channels, analytics, and marketing technology. You’ll learn to apply core digital marketing skills like market research, search engine optimization, CRM, and automation, and launch multi-channel brand, acquisition, and retention campaigns. Whether you want to pursue a full-fledged marketing career or have a substantial grasp on marketing language and skills to support other work, this course will equip you with formal training and a portfolio to establish yourself as a competitive candidate. 

Learn more about Digital Marketing On Demand at General Assembly.

How Our Immersive Graduates Get Jobs: GA’s Outcomes Report 2018-2019

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“The most reliable way to predict the future is to create it.”
— Abraham Lincoln

A New World

We began 2020, the new decade, in a way that none of us could have ever imagined. The COVID-19 pandemic quickly turned our world upside down, affecting millions. News of layoffs and a collective unease about the future permeates our every day. We are in an adjustment period — an opportunity to reflect, gain clarity, resolve, and find out just how strong and capable we are.

General Assembly was created in 2011, in the aftermath of the last recession, to help people pursue work they love and find inspiration in a strong community of entrepreneurs, technologists, creators, and innovators. We know so many of you are feeling uncertain, and we want you to know that we’re not going anywhere. An increasingly digital world demands digital-first skills — in greater numbers. The technology, marketing, design, and data skills we teach will be more resilient and relevant in a post-COVID-19 era. 

Our 2018–2019 Outcomes Report: the Full Story

Today, we are excited to share our latest Outcomes Report; it was just reviewed by KPMG, a Big Four* accounting firm, which looks at the graduation and job placement rates for 4,287 students completing their programs over 18 months, between January 1, 2018, and March 31, 2019.

 Here are some highlights from our recent report:

  • 91.4% of graduates who participated in GA’s full-time Career Services program accepted a job offer in their field of study within 180 days of graduating. 
  • An additional 8.3% accepted a job offer after 180 days, for a total of 99.7% of this eligible population working in their fields.
  • GA grads have gone on to work at top multi-industry companies including Amazon, Charles Schwab, Dell, Google, Home Depot, IBM, and more.

We have a diverse community of students, and our outcomes rates remain strong as we create pathways for people from a wider variety of professional backgrounds and life experiences.

We also know that the Outcomes Report only tells one part of the story: the first job that a graduate secures post-GA. To find out what happens over time, we surveyed our alumni base last year with the global polling firm Gallup and learned the following:

  • 106%: Average percentage that Immersive graduates see their income increase within five years of graduation from General Assembly.
  • One year after the course, 84% of graduates were happier in their careers, and 74% were making more money. 

Why Us?

Most students who come to General Assembly’s Immersive programs do so for one reason: to find a job in a new career. From the beginning, we established rigorous standards that ensure our graduates are meeting their career goals and getting a return on their education investment. 

You won’t be doing it alone. As Matt Brems, our Lead Data Science Instructor, shares, “It’s important to note that this time isn’t spent alone! Your peers in the industry attend meetups. Your classmates work beside you and with you to hone skills. And your instructors are dedicated to supporting you as you put your best foot forward beyond General Assembly. You are joining a community, and we’re ready to welcome you into it.” 

Our Unwavering Commitment 

Griffin Moore (they/them), one of our Career Coaches in Washington DC, shares, “Career changes are tough. Imposter syndrome or fear of the unknown can overwhelm even the most seasoned tech professionals. As a career coach, I serve as a partner in accountability, strategy, and motivation. I work with students from day one of their Immersive to develop their personal brand and job-search tools, all the way until they sign their job offer.”

Going forward, we know the job market will look different for everyone — not just our graduates. Our commitment to our students remains the same. Teaching relevant skills, preparing people for their job searches, partnering with employers, and working with students to find the best possible outcomes — we’re continuing to adapt in real-time to respond to the most current events. Here’s how we’re changing our approach:

  • Free workshops. We’re making more content and curriculum free to ensure that people seeking jobs have more opportunities to gain new skills. Free Fridays offer our most popular workshops and events for free every Friday. 
  • Remote training. We’ve trained all our career coaches in remote coaching and curriculum delivery and are updating our curriculum in real-time to make sure it reflects the current state of job seeking.
  • Deeper relationships. We’ve invested more deeply in our partnerships efforts, delivering weekly insights and engagements to our teams, conducting outreach to growing industries, and finding ways to support our hiring community during this time.
  • Reskilling partnerships. We’re training laid-off workers. We launched our first reskilling coalition in Louisville, KY, and we expect to announce many more in the coming months.
  • Strategy shifts. We’re helping our grads identify how to shift their job search processes at the moment. We’re advising them to watch industry trends, grow their community networks, build their skills, and shift expectations around weekly job search success — the application process may be slower, but we encourage an increase in online networking and expanded industry learning.
  • Increased resources. We are working with our loan partners to ease the financial burden of loan repayments, make more job search strategy sessions available to all graduates, and focus on building an online community to ensure job seekers have a more robust set of supports as they pursue professional opportunities. We’re also adding new mental health resources for students and grads through our partnership with Ginger.io

Next Steps

  1. Read the report. We’ve got personal accounts from our staff, along with hard facts and figures for you to digest — our report is the most holistic way to see what we are doing for you
  2. Talk to a member of our Admissions team. Clara Graham, Senior Admissions Producer, emphasizes that “It’s a time to get to know (a prospective student), to understand their readiness for our rigorous immersive courses.” If now is not the time, don’t worry — we have a lot of options for you. 
  3. Not sure you’re ready? Participate in a remote Free Fridays workshop to try us out! We recently created Free Fridays, 100% free weekly workshops that skill-build with our most popular topics. 
  4. There’s no better time to begin anew. Connect With Our Admissions Team

Read Our Report

Explore Our 2018–2019 Outcomes Report

*The Big Four accounting firms refer to Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), KPMG, and Ernst & Young. These firms are the four largest professional services firms in the world that provide audit and transaction advisory.

Have You Considered Exploring a Coding Career?

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You may also enjoy exploring data.

You appear to be a naturally skilled problem solver who understands how parts logically fit together to form a functioning whole. Maybe you thrive on finding better, more efficient ways forward, which is great for building dynamic custom tools or solutions from scratch.

Relevant job titles

Full-Stack Software Engineer

Front-End Web Developer

Engineering Manager

Technical Support Engineer

Solutions Engineer

Data Scientist

Data Engineer

Business Intelligence Analyst

Product Analyst

Marketing Analyst

YOUR IDEAL COLLABORATORS

Your ideal collaborators may include developers and technical stakeholders, as well as data analysts and visual communicators. These above-mentioned roles will allow you to collaborate with an assortment of teams — marketing, finance, sales, product, and design — while utilizing an array of crossover skill sets.

CURIOUS TO EXPLORE?

Here are some great starting places to inspire you:

  • Take one of our popular free intro classes in coding or data analytics.
  • Check out five steps to getting your first job in software engineering.
  • Discover why data skills are great for non-math backgrounds 
  • See how one GA grad went from barista to analyst and a threefold pay increase.
  • Check out five reasons you should learn to code.
Browse Upcoming Workshops

Have You Considered Exploring a Marketing Career?

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You may also enjoy product management or data.

You appear to be a strategic thinker with a knack for balancing vision, intuition, adaptibility, and logic to achieve aspirational goals. You’re energized by people and care about what’s best for your teams, users, and ultimately, the big picture strategy. You might find it rewarding to work with cross-functional stakeholders and data to guide campaigns and product launches toward long-term success.

Relevant job titles

Marketing Manager

Content Strategist

SEO Specialist

Product Marketing Manager

Brand Manager

Marketing Operations Manager

Business Intelligence Analyst

Product Manager

Data Analyst

Technical Project Manager

YOUR IDEAL COLLABORATORS

Your ideal collaborators may include like-minded strategists with interests that span business, design, and tech, as well as strong verbal communicators and visual problem solvers. These above-mentioned roles allow you to collaborate with an assortment of teams — marketing, finance, sales, product, and design — while utilizing an array of crossover skill sets.

CURIOUS TO EXPLORE?

Here are some great starting places to inspire you:

  • Check out our popular free intro classes in marketing, product management, or data analytics.
  • Learn how to break into a digital marketing career.
  • Read how one GA digital marketing grad went from intern to marketing director.
  • See why data skills are great for non-math backgrounds.
  • Learn about 5 things great product managers do every day.
Browse Upcoming Workshops

Have You Considered Exploring a UX Design Career?

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You may also enjoy product management or data.

You appear to be an empathetic visual thinker that’s attuned to aesthetic details and how they’re perceived. You care deeply about others, and can conduct interviews and research needed to understand and offer clear solutions to usability problems. You may be well-suited to help create delightful, useful experiences and compelling designs.

Relevant job titles

User Experience Designer

UX Researcher

Interaction Designer

Product Designer

User Interface Designer

Product Manager

Product Analyst

Project Manager

Business Intelligence Analyst

Data Scientist

YOUR IDEAL COLLABORATORS

Your ideal collaborators may include like-minded visual communicators, as well as content strategists, marketers, data analysts, and developers. These above-mentioned roles will allow you to collaborate with an assortment of teams — marketing, finance, sales, product, and design — while utilizing an array of crossover skill sets.

CURIOUS TO EXPLORE?

Here are some great starting places to inspire you:

  • Check out our popular free intro classes in UX design, product management, or data analytics.
  • Discover 7 roles you could get with UX design skills.
  • Watch some of our best instructors explain why having UX skills can boost your career.
  • Learn about 5 things great product managers do every day.
  • See why data skills are great for non-math backgrounds.
Browse Upcoming Workshops

Have You Considered Exploring a UX Design Career?

By

You may also enjoy data or coding.

You appear to be an empathetic visual thinker that’s attuned to aesthetic details and how they’re perceived. You can balance data, logic, vision, and intuition to understand and offer clear solutions to usability problems. You may be well-suited to help craft delightfully efficient, useful experiences and compelling designs.

Relevant job titles

Product Designer

User Interface Designer

UX Researcher

Interaction Designer

User Interface Developer

Full-Stack Software Engineer

Front-End Web Developer

Business Intelligence Analyst

Data Engineer

Product Analyst

YOUR IDEAL COLLABORATORS

Your ideal collaborators may include like-minded visual communicators, as well as researchers, content strategists, product managers, data analysts, and developers. These above-mentioned roles will allow you to collaborate with an assortment of teams — marketing, finance, sales, product, and design — while utilizing an array of crossover skill sets.

CURIOUS TO EXPLORE?

Here are some great starting places to inspire you:

  • Check out our popular free intro classes in UX design, coding or data analytics.
  • Discover 7 roles you could get with UX design skills.
  • Watch some of our best instructors explain why having UX skills can boost your career.
  • See why data skills are great for non-math backgrounds.
  • Learn about five reasons you should learn to code.
Browse Upcoming Workshops

Have You Considered Exploring a Product Management Career?

By

You may also enjoy data or coding.

You appear to be a big picture thinker with a knack for balancing vision, intuition, adaptability, and logic to achieve clear goals. You thrive around other people and care about what’s best for the team and your users. You might find it rewarding to work with cross-functional stakeholders and data to guide complex projects toward long-term success.

Relevant job titles

Product Manager

Technical Project Manager

Product Analyst

Product Owner

Operations Manager

Web Developer

Technical Support Engineer

Business Intelligence Analyst

Data Engineer

Solutions Engineer

YOUR IDEAL COLLABORATORS

Your ideal collaborators may include like-minded strategists with interests that span business, design, and tech, as well as strong visual communicators. These above-mentioned roles will allow you to collaborate with an assortment of teams — marketing, finance, sales, product, and design — while utilizing an array of crossover skill sets.

CURIOUS TO EXPLORE?

Here are some great starting places to inspire you:

  • Check out our popular free intro classes in product management, coding or data analytics.
  • Watch two of our best instructors explain why having product management skills can boost your career.
  • Learn about 5 things great product managers do every day.
  • Why data skills are great for non-math backgrounds.
  • See five reasons you should learn to code.
Browse Upcoming Workshops

How to Find a Job—And Change Careers—During COVID-19

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Over the years, GA’s career coaches have helped thousands of students from our full-time immersive programs land jobs with our A-list hiring partners. Now, with a transformed hiring climate, many career changers are faced with more uncertainty than ever about the likelihood of getting a new role, let alone navigating a job search remotely.

The good news is that there are reasons to be hopeful. In this recorded session, get expert advice from GA’s U.S. career coaches on how job searching has been transformed by COVID-19. Whether you’re on an active job search or curious about what the U.S. job market is like right now, you’ll gain valuable insight about how job seeking has changed and how you can stand out amongst the competition—regardless of your work experience.

See How Our Career Services Program Works

How to Run a Python Script

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As a blooming Python developer who has just written some Python code, you’re immediately faced with the important question, “how do I run it?” Before answering that question, let’s back up a little to cover one of the fundamental elements of Python.

An Interpreted Language

Python is an interpreted programming language, meaning Python code must be run using the Python interpreter.

Traditional programming languages like C/C++ are compiled, meaning that before it can be run, the human-readable code is passed into a compiler (special program) to generate machine code – a series of bytes providing specific instructions to specific types of processors. However, Python is different. Since it’s an interpreted programming language, each line of human-readable code is passed to an interpreter that converts it to machine code at run time.

So to run Python code, all you have to do is point the interpreter at your code.

Different Versions of the Python Interpreter

It’s critical to point out that there are different versions of the Python interpreter. The major versions you’ll likely see are Python 2 and Python 3, but there are sub-versions (i.e. Python 2.7, Python 3.5, Python 3.7, etc.). Sometimes these differences are subtle. Sometimes they’re dramatically different. It’s important to always know which version is compatible with your Python code.

Run a script using the Python interpreter

To run a script, we have to point the Python interpreter at our Python code…but how do we do that? There are a few different ways, and there are some differences between how Windows and Linux/Mac do things. For these examples, we’re assuming that both Python 2.7 and Python 3.5 are installed.

Our Test Script

For our examples, we’re going to start by using this simple script called test.py.

test.py
print(“Aw yeah!”)'

How to Run a Python Script on Windows

The py Command

The default Python interpreter is referenced on Windows using the command py. Using the Command Prompt, you can use the -V option to print out the version.

Command Prompt
> py -V
Python 3.5

You can also specify the version of Python you’d like to run. For Windows, you can just provide an option like -2.7 to run version 2.7.

Command Prompt
> py -2.7 -V
Python 2.7

On Windows, the .py extension is registered to run a file with that extension using the Python interpreter. However, the version of the default Python interpreter isn’t always consistent, so it’s best to always run your scripts as explicitly as possible.

To run a script, use the py command to specify the Python interpreter followed by the name of the script you want to run with the interpreter. To avoid using the full path to your script (i.e. X:\General Assembly\test.py), make sure your Command Prompt is in the same directory as your script. For example, to run our script test.py, run the following command:

Command Prompt
> py -3.5 test.py
Aw yeah!

Using a Batch File

If you don’t want to have to remember which version to use every time you run your Python program, you can also create a batch file to specify the command. For instance, create a batch file called test.bat with the contents:

test.bat
@echo off
py -3.5 test.py

This file simply runs your py command with the desired options. It includes an optional line “@echo off” that prevents the py command from being echoed to the screen when it’s run. If you find the echo helpful, just remove that line.

Now, if you want to run your Python program test.py, all you have to do is run this batch file.

Command Prompt
> test.bat
Aw yeah!

How to Run a Python Script on Linux/Mac

The py Command

Linux/Mac references the Python interpreter using the command python. Similar to the Windows py command, you can print out the version using the -V option.

Terminal
$ python -V
Python 2.7

For Linux/Mac, specifying the version of Python is a bit more complicated than Windows because the python commands are typically a bunch of symbolic links (symlinks) or shortcuts to other commands. Typically, python is a symlink to the command python2, python2 is a symlink to a command like python2.7, and python3 is a symlink to a command like python3.5. One way to view the different python commands available to you is using the following command:

Terminal
$ ls -1 $(which python)* | egrep ‘python($|[0-9])’ | egrep -v config
/usr/bin/python
/usr/bin/python2
/usr/bin/python2.7
/usr/bin/python3
/usr/bin/python3.5

To run our script, you can use the Python interpreter command and point it to the script.

Terminal
$ python3.5 test.py
Aw yeah!

However, there’s a better way of doing this.

Using a shebang

First, we’re going to modify the script so it has an additional line at the top starting with ‘#!’ and known as a shebang (shebangs, shebangs…).

test.py
#!/usr/bin/env python3.5
print(“Aw yeah!”)

This special shebang line tells the computer how to interpret the contents of the file. If you executed the file test.py without that line, it would look for special instruction bytes and be confused when all it finds is text. With that line, the computer knows that it should run the contents of the file as Python code using the Python interpreter.

You could also replace that line with the full path to the interpreter:

#!/usr/bin/python3.5

However, different versions of Linux might install the Python interpreter in different locations, so this method can cause problems. For maximum portability, I always use the line with /usr/bin/env that looks for the python3.5 command by searching the PATH environment variable, but the choice is up to you.

Next, we’re going to set the permissions of this file to be executable with this command:

Terminal
$ chmod +x test.py

Now we can run the program using the command ./test.py!

Terminal
$ ./test.py
Aw yeah!

Pretty sweet, eh?

Run the Python Interpreter Interactively

One of the awesome things about Python is that you can run the interpreter in an interactive mode. Instead of using your py or python command pointing to a file, run it by itself, and you’ll get something that looks like this:

Command Prompt
> py
Python 3.7.3 (v3.7.3:ef4ec6ed12, Mar 25 2019, 21:26:53) [MSC v.1916 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

Now you get an interactive command prompt where you can type in individual lines of Python!

Command Prompt (Python Interpreter)
>>> print(“Aw yeah!”)
Aw yeah!

What’s great about using the interpreter in interactive mode is that you can test out individual lines of Python code without writing an entire program. It also remembers what you’ve done, just like in a script, so things like functions and variables work the exact same way.

Command Prompt (Python Interpreter)
>>> x = "Still got it."
>>> print(x)
Still got it.

How to Run a Python Script from a Text Editor

Depending on your workflow, you may prefer to run your Python program directly from your text editor. Different text editors provide fancy ways of doing the same thing we’ve already done — pointing the Python interpreter at your Python code. To help you along, I’ve provided instructions on how to do this in four popular text editors.

  1. Notepad++
  2. VSCode
  3. Sublime Text
  4. Vim

1. Notepad++

Notepad++ is my favorite general purpose text editor to use on Windows. It’s also super easy to run a Python program from it.

Step 1: Press F5 to open up the Run… dialogue

Step 2: Enter the py command like you would on the command line, but instead of entering the name of your script, use the variable FULL_CURRENT_PATH like so:

py -3.5 -i "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

You’ll notice that I’ve also included a -i option to our py command to “inspect interactively after running the script”. All that means is it leaves the command prompt open after it’s finished, so instead of printing “Aw yeah!” and then immediately quitting, you get to see the Python program’s output.

Step 3: Click Run

2. VSCode

VSCode is a Windows text editor designed specifically to work with code, and I’ve recently become a big fan of it. Running a Python program from VSCode is a bit complicated to set it up, but once you’ve done that, it works quite nicely.

Step 1: Go to the Extensions section by clicking this symbol or pressing CTRL+SHIFT+X.

Step 2: Search and install the extensions named Python and Code Runner, then restart VSCode.

Step 3: Right click in the text area and click the Run Code option or press CTRL+ALT+N to run the code.

Note: Depending on how you installed Python, you might run into an error here that says ‘python’ is not recognized as an internal or external command. By default, Python only installs the py command, but VSCode is quite intent on using the python command which is not currently in your PATH. Don’t worry, we can easily fix that.

Step 3.1: Locate your Python installation binary or download another copy from www.python.org/downloads. Run it, then select Modify.

Step 3.2: Click next without modifying anything until you get to the Advanced Options, then check the box next to Add Python to environment variables. Then click Install, and let it do its thing.

Step 3.3: Go back to VSCode and try again. Hopefully, it should now look a bit more like this:

3. Sublime Text

Sublime Text is a popular text editor to use on Mac, and setting it up to run a Python program is super simple.

Step 1: In the menu, go to Tools → Build System and select Python.

Step 2: Press command +b or in the menu, go to Tools → Build.

4. Vim

Vim is my text editor of choice when it comes to developing on Linux/Mac, and it can also be used to easily run a Python program.

Step 1: Enter the command :w !python3 and hit enter.

Step 2: Profit.

Now that you can successfully run your Python code, you’re well on your way to speaking parseltongue!

– – – – –

Explore Our Upcoming Coding Programs