Male Allies Workshop

New York City Campus

GA NYC (Manhattan), Classrooms
10 East 21st Street
New York NY 10010

Past Locations for this Class

Male Allies Workshop | New York City

New York City Campus

GA NYC (Manhattan), Classrooms
10 East 21st Street
New York NY 10010

Past Locations for this Class

About this class

80% of men believe it’s important to fix issues women face in the workplace. For well-intentioned men, gender bias at work must be made explicit and personal in order to rewire tendencies and get men actionably supporting female colleagues. In this experiential workshop, male employees increase awareness of the difficulties faced by women in their workplace – and across all workplaces and industries – and learn methods for becoming allies to female colleagues. The objective of the Male Allies workshop is to strengthen men’s understanding of and action towards gender bias in the workplace, and provide a safe forum in which men can communicate openly about sensitive issues.

Takeaways

Participants will learn challenges women are up against including:

• the lack of women in leadership positions due to unequal advice and mentoring, job application qualifications, and absence of consideration for promotion; • societal expectations of men to talk and women to listen, and of men to look out for themselves and women to help others; • micro-inequalities, such as frequent interruptions and the expectation to do “office housework”; • the double bind.

Participants will learn to support female colleagues through: • listening, in order to combat interruptions, unintentionally taking credit for a female colleague’s ideas, and “mansplaining”; • giving critical feedback to women, which studies show men often shy away from due to “protective hesitation” and prevents women from advancing into leadership positions; • vouching, which studies show is an effective method for eliminating bias; • brainstorming actionable next steps they can take to make their workplace an even better, more equal, and more inclusive place to work. • maintaining appropriate status, or “attitudes of power,” to practice creating space for female colleagues and adjusting communication habits to be more inclusive of women;

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