Tag Archives: uxdi

How One Student Transformed Her Passion For UX Design into an Internship with GA

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evelyn kim

Evelyn Kim, UXDI Grad & Super Intern.

Evelyn Kim was fresh out of college when a Facebook ad enticed her to apply for the UX Design Immersive program here at GA. Now, after completing the 10-week, full-time program, she has just started an internship on our very own Instructional Development team, and she is ready to take her UX career to new heights.

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‘Designing the Editorial Experience’: When Content Strategy and Design Come Together

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Sue Apfelbaum

“A lot of smart people are writing books and sharing their knowledge, and I never thought that I would be one of them,” says Sue Apfelbaum, a User Experience Design graduate who recently co-authored the book, Designing the Editorial Experience: A Primer for Print, Web and Mobile.

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What’s a Wireframe? Get Behind the Buzz.

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Finding a UX Design Job: Chapter 3

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Rain is a recent UX Design Immersive graduate, full time UX designer, and fan of good clean designs. In this blog she tells her story of finding a job and her insights to the London UX field. Here are her first and second chapters.

So I did the leg work and the phone was finally ringing. Each company is different in its process of hiring, as are recruiters. I will try and cover all here:

The email:

This can come from any of the online places you published yourself as well as a direct response to your application. These emails tend to be short and aim to filter you from the other applicants. Questions will be direct and ask for your salary expectations, type of work and starting date. If you don’t know the answer or want to see what they might offer, try and research the company a bit to get a sense of the role before responding. If the person contacting you is in HR or a hiring manager, try and set a face to face interview at this point to skip the phone call stage.

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How to Find a UX Design Job: Chapter 2

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finding ux design job

Rain is a GA UX Design Immersive graduate, full time UX designer, and fan of good clean designs. Her background is in architecture and product design. In her spare time she is either at the gym or coming up with new app ideas. In this blog she tells her story of finding a job and her insights to the London UX field. You can read her first chapter here.

So now everything is in place and order, you put yourself out there and have the basics to get people interested. What’s next?

Setting expectations: I went into the job market knowing UX is a booming market with huge demand and very little supply. My expectations were sky high. I expected high volume phone calls and interviews and thought I would find a job within 2-3 weeks. So let’s bring it back to reality a little. Yes, there is demand, and yes, there is short supply but also, I had very little real life experience and most companies simply don’t have the time to teach you.

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How to Find a UX Design Job: Chapter 1

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Rain is a recent GA UX Design Immersive graduate, full time UX designer, and fan of good clean designs. Her background is in architecture and product design. In her spare time she is either at the gym or coming up with new app ideas. In this blog series, she shares her story of finding a job and her insights on the London UX field.

The first part of my UX journey was done. I was a qualified UX designer with limited experience, a limited portfolio of work, and a CV that still read ‘Interior designer’. Before I jumped into getting a job or even an interview, there was a lot of prep work I had to do to even be considered. This is chapter 1 of 3 in which I will explain the process I went through to find a job in UX.

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InnovateNYP: GA Alumni Hack the Best Online Patient Care Experience

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Health warriors

Last month, a group of GA Alumni took part in InnovateNYP: a hackathon hosted by NY Presbyterian Hospital. The challenge was to create the best online patient care experience, and our group of alumni didn’t disappoint as they took home first place for best overall prototype. We had some time to sit and chat with them about their experience, here’s their story.

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DIY Recruiting for User Research: The B&B Model

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Colleen is a User Experience Researcher at GA in New York. 

Recruiting for user research takes time and close attention to detail. It could easily be compared to running a bed and breakfast with users similar to houseguests. Here at GA, we use a few different do-it-yourself methods, but my recipe for recruiting always includes the user, preparation, organization and a little dash of hospitality.

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Five Tricks for Breaking into UX Design

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The field of User Experience Design is growing rapidly. According to Qconnects, a California-based talent agency, requests for UX designers rose by 70% from 2011 to 2012, with starting salaries averaging $60,000 (Usability Professionals Association, 2011 Salary Survey). There’s high demand, a shortage of supply, and in that gap, a fantastic opportunity for individuals to learn these critical skills and transition into the field. Here are five easy ways to get started:

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How to Teach UX: Methods and Philosophies

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User Experience Design Immersive at General Assembly

When General Assembly decided to add a new full-time, immersive program to its suite of educational offerings, user experience (UX) design was the clear topic of choice. UX is a rapidly growing field looking for talented designers passionate about shaping the future, and we were excited to design a program that prepared these folks to do just that. With that, the User Experience Design Immersive (UXDI) program was born.

UXDI is truly the first of its kind. We’ve been able to take skills and methods that have developed over the last 20 years and turned them into one of the first formal programs to teach UX design. Through the process of creating the course, we learned a lot about how UX should be taught, and developed the following three guiding philosophies:

1. Embrace Ambiguity

“It depends” is a key part of any UX designer’s vocabulary, but its use in a classroom environment can lead to pretty significant frustration. There are plenty of reasons why teaching UX is quite ambiguous; this is, after all, a rapidly evolving field that prides itself on prioritizing the user and not trying to find the best answer, but rather going after better answers.

UX Design: Embrace Ambiguity

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