Tag Archives: teaching at general assembly

Happy Instructor Appreciation Week from GA

By

Instructor Appreciation Week at General Assembly

Phil Lamplugh, General Assembly’s first full-time Web Development Immersive instructor ever.

Without our incredible instructors, General Assembly would not exist. It actually could not exist. It’s their passion, real-world expertise, and desire to share their knowledge with our students that make this place so valuable to communities around the world. Our instructors are awesome, and they deserve recognition. That’s why, to celebrate them and all they do, we extended National Teacher’s Day into a full Instructor Appreciation Week across our campuses: happy hours, catered lunches, and even some sweet chalk art.

Anna Lindow, GM of Campus Education at General Assembly, has been with us since 2011, and has seen how far our courses and educational offerings have come. She works closely with members of the campus team, instructors, and instructor assistants — from Seattle to London to Hong Kong.

Whether you’ve learned from one, want to learn from one, or are one yourself, join us in spotlighting GA’s spectacular instructors. Anna gives us a peek into the lives of these educational leaders and gets to the heart of why they mean so much to our mission.

Continue reading

Instructor Stories: Faz Besharatian Inspires Students to Work as a Team in UXDI

By

January 23, 2015_IMG_9712

Faz (top row second from the left) with his UXDI students at General Assembly.

After several years designing for nonprofits and companies, Faz decided to make a go of freelancing full-time. After almost three years of choosing his own projects and clients, Faz committed to teaching the first UXDI course at General Assembly DC. He’s taught almost every UXDI cohort since.

Follow Faz on Twitter @faz Continue reading

How Teaching Reignited My Passion For Programming

By

teaching at General Assembly

During the winter of 2014, I started questioning myself about my long term goals. I had been developing for some time, and I love coding very much. It actually involves a lot of thinking prior to taking any action. Plus, coding requires a combination of Cartesian mind with good instinct; two qualities you’d rarely put together. The closest analogy to this would be a chess game: there is no way you can predict every outcome, and you still have to make a move given time and resource constraints.

Continue reading