programming Tag Archives - General Assembly Blog

How Learning to Program Reprograms You

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Stephanie Morillo is an Associate Education Programs Producer at General Assembly in NYC.

When I was in the fourth grade, my school’s principal made us write down a list of the things we said we can’t do. She then made us put our lists in a box and we buried it in the school’s yard (RIP “I Can’t”, d. Nov 22nd 1996).  Since then, however, “I can’t” has made frequent visits from the beyond, creeping into my consciousness in those moments when I was confronted with a problem I didn’t know how to solve and grew easily discouraged.

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Alumni Interview: Melody & Grace

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Meet Grace Kim (left) & Melody Tran (right), graduates of our Front-End Web Development course in NYC, both currently working at ExpandTheRoom.

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“Lights, Camera, Code” Scholarship Winners

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This winter, we teamed up with LaunchPad LA, Cross Campus, and Los Angeles Venture Association to offer a select number of $2,000 scholarships to our full-time Web Development Immersive program at our brand-new campus in Los Angeles, California. After pouring over thousands of applications, we are excited to present the five winners who will be embarking on a 12-week journey to become full-stack web developers.

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Learning Ruby-On-Rails at General Assembly: One Year Later

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It was mid-November last year that I graduated from General Assembly’s Ruby-on-Rails backend course.  Since then, I’ve built and launched my first startup, a marketplace for conference videos, called Xavy.

Before joining the course, I had massive reservations about whether I would actually be able to code.  I’d tried and failed to learn independently at least three times before.  I have always studied humanities subjects and avoided logic or maths wherever possible. My family and friends thought I was joking when I told them what I planned on doing, the response generally being “but you’re not remotely technical!”

Well, I took the course and succeeded in learning to code, so thank you GA for helping me learn the technical skills I needed to start executing on the vision I had for Xavy.

However, you can’t learn everything in 8 weeks, so here are some of the technical lessons I’ve learned since graduating, which could prove useful to anyone else taking the course:

There’s no substitute for hard work.

If you expect to turn up to class, do the 2 x 2 hour lessons each week and be a decent programmer 8 weeks later, you will probably not get the results you want.  I put in a lot of additional hours between classes, and particularly in the early days, it’s important to build your ‘muscle memory’ for the key concepts until they become second nature. Continue reading

Getting to Know You: David Fisher

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Current Role: Cofounder and Trustee, Awesome Foundation
Twitter: @tibbon
Personal website: www.awesomefoundation.org

1. Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina. While Greensboro isn’t known for its tech scene, I was able to take several computer and programming-related classes in high school which helped me to get a handful of internships and entry level positions at a pretty young age. My father always helped nudge me toward working with computers, starting with buying a Commodore 64 for the house in the mid 80’s.

2. What did you study?

I went to Berklee College of Music and received my degree in Music Business Management. It might seem like a bit of a strange path, but I was always trying to position myself at the intersection of music and technology.

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5 Steps for Getting Started Designing and Building a Website

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Keep your goals in sight. You’ve made your resolutions — we want to help you keep them (at least the ones that aren’t food related). That’s why we’ve put together five simple things you can do to get started with Front-End Web Development.

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5 Steps for Getting Started Coding a Web App

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Keep your goals in sight. You’ve made your resolutions — we want to help you keep them (at least the ones that aren’t food related). That’s why we’ve put together five simple things you can do to get started in Back-End Web Development using Ruby on Rails.

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What Is Front-End Web Development?

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Advanced-Front-End-Web-Development

Name: Nick Schaden (@nschaden)
Occupation: Web Designer/Developer

1. In 140 characters or less, what is front-end web development?

A mix of programming and layout that powers the visuals and interactions of the web.

2. If a website were a house, front-end web development would be ______?

The pretty exterior that gives the house character, or the host that invites guests in and makes them feel at home.

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Technically Speaking: GitHub

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If you’re reading this post, you’re probably not a programmer. (No worries. You’re in safe hands, here.) If you are a programmer, odds are you’re plugged into GitHub right now, building the next great something. That, or you’re too busy writing an endless book of gushing sonnets about the much-loved service to read an article like this.

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Technically Speaking: Ruby on Rails

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Whether you’re a rapper who’s become too rich and powerful, or a web framework that’s become popular beyond anyone’s expectations, one thing is true: haters gonna hate. This is the case with Ruby on Rails, perhaps more so than any other topic in the developer community in recent years. It’s the code messiah, or it’s worthless – everyone has their opinion. In any event, Ruby on Rails powers many of the web’s most popular services – Airbnb, Groupon, and Hulu to name a few – and is at the heart of at least 250,000 other sites on the internet. Let’s dive in and take a closer look at what it is.

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