Tag Archives: html

Getting Started With Front-End Web Development

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learn to code

So, you want to learn to code? Awesome! Knowing how to code can help you level up in your current role, open new career opportunities, and empower you to make your app or website ideas come to life. But where should you start?

Although hotly contested among developers, most novice coders begin their education by learning the basics of front-end web development, or the client-facing side of web development. The front end involves what the end user sees, like the design/appearance of the web page.

In order to become a front-end developer, there are three “languages” you need to master: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, or as I like to call them, “The Holy Trinity.”

Below, I explain the difference between these three languages, and how they work in concert to get a simple website up and running.

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Web Design Circuit: Designer Tools & Tricks

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The Web Design Circuit is a 12-week online course where students learn how to code and design websites with the help of a mentor. Watch the above video to hear more information about the course and get a sample design and coding lesson.

Secure your spot in the next instance of Web Design Circuit by enrolling now, or visit us at ga.co/webdesign for more information.

Enroll to Secure Your Spot

Here’s How to Learn HTML at Any Level or Budget

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Learn to Code HTML

Have you been thinking about learning HTML? If so, you’re not alone: These days, it  seems like nearly everyone — including New York City’s former mayor, Mike Bloomberg, who tweeted his New Year’s resolution to learn to code a few years back — is intent on learning programming languages. If you want to learn HTML, a fundamental building block for front-end web development, there’s no need to delay. Workshops and on-demand classes make it easy to learn HTML, regardless of your budget, schedule, or prior knowledge.

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New To Front-End Web Development? Here Are The Basics of HTML and CSS

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The Basics ImageWhen you’re crafting content for the web, how does the browser know to place a break between paragraphs? For that matter, how does it know to make a page’s background one color, and the navigation bar another color? HTML and CSS are the answer: Browsers read HTML, a markup language, to determine what shows up on the page, and where. CSS, or cascading style sheets, determines how content appears throughout a website. That is to say, HTML will tell the browser “this is a header” and CSS will say “all headers should be green.”

Related Story: 4 Reasons to Code Your Own Website, Even Though There’s Squarespace

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GA Partners with Tumblr to Add Custom Theme Lessons to Dash

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unnamed-1

Since its launch last October, people have built over 400,000 web pages in Dash, our online learn-to-code program which teaches beginners to build websites by creating real projects using HTML, CSS and Javascript. Today we are thrilled to announce a partnership with Tumblr, which makes learning to code even more accessible and relevant. Dash now offers lessons that will allow anyone to build custom Tumblr blog themes and seamlessly publish those themes to Tumblr. And it’s free.

We believe that people learn best by working on real-world projects that have practical applications–at work and in their lives. With over 184,000,000 blogs, Tumblr has built one of the strongest and most passionate communities of creators on the web, and the lessons we’ve built in Dash will make it easy for users to learn code to better express themselves through their Tumblrs with a custom theme. For some learners, this may be a first step toward a lifelong passion for coding, or even a new career as a web developer.

The help and support of the team at Tumblr has been instrumental in building these lessons, which are designed to make it simple for beginners with no prior coding experience to quickly and easily create one-of-a-kind themes. We’re excited about this opportunity to work with a company that so many know and love to introduce more people to web development and empower them to learn a new skill and create something unique and tangible along the way.

P.S. To kick this off, we’ll be hosting a series of meetups starting June 21st. See if there’s one in your city and RSVP to meet other theme-makers in the making.

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A Website is like a House. Here’s Why

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Website House Metaphor

Metaphors are great ways to bridge the knowledge gap between technical and non-technical team members. But instead of bombarding non-technical folks with acronyms and jargon, it helps to first establish a baseline understanding of how different technologies work together. One way I like to do this is by comparing a website to a house.

1. The Frame: HTML (HyperText Markup Language)

A house has rooms, and each room contains furniture and electric appliances. Similarly, a webpage has sections (e.g. header, body, footer), and each section contains images and text. HTML organizes and presents elements of a webpage in a structured hierarchy. Here’s an example of pseudo-HTML describing the elements in our house:

[code language=”html”]
<house>
<second_floor>
<bedroom>
<bed />
</bedroom>
</second_floor>
<first_floor>
<living_room>
<television />
</living_room>
<kitchen>
<fridge />
</kitchen>
<entrance>
<front_door>
<door_bell>
</front_door>
</entrance>
</first_floor>
</house>
[/code]

2. The Look: CSS (Cascading Style Sheets)

Not all rooms, tables, and chairs look the same, nor do words or images on a page. That’s where CSS comes in – CSS defines how elements look, describing their color, size, position, shape, and more. Here’s an example of how we’d use pseudo-CSS to style a bedroom in our house:

[code language=”css”]
bedroom {
width: 12ft;
height: 8ft;
walls: 1mm wallpaper matte;
floor: carpet
}
[/code]

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What Is Front-End Web Development?

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Advanced-Front-End-Web-Development

Name: Nick Schaden (@nschaden)
Occupation: Web Designer/Developer

1. In 140 characters or less, what is front-end web development?

A mix of programming and layout that powers the visuals and interactions of the web.

2. If a website were a house, front-end web development would be ______?

The pretty exterior that gives the house character, or the host that invites guests in and makes them feel at home.

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