entrepreneurship Tag Archives - General Assembly Blog | Page 2

10 Books To Read Before Pitching Your Startup

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Image Courtesy of Rodrigo Galindez on Flickr

One of the first things a startup should build is a library. Business books can help hone or disrupt your way of thinking (sometimes in ways that are subtle, sometimes in thunderclaps), they can help you learn from examples and case studies, and they keep you up with the latest jargon at pitch meetings and cocktail parties. Of course, new books come out all the time, and everyone has their personal favorites, but these essential titles should help you fill your startup library.

Related Story: Considering Business School? Read These 10 Books Instead

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5 Reasons to Take the Leap and Be Your Own CEO

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If you’re experiencing fatigue at least five days a week, hypersensitivity to everything office-related, including timecards and long meetings, and nausea at the thought of staying at your current job any longer… then you’re probably suffering from what I call a “corporate allergy.”

Unfortunately, this sort of allergy isn’t relieved so simply as popping a few Claritin. If you’re in this position, don’t worry (I’ve been there, and help clients through similar situations every day). It’s just time to get clear about what to do next.

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Ben Horowitz on “The Hard Thing About Hard Things”

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Ben Horowitz, one of the most respected entrepreneurs in tech, stopped by General Assembly in New York for a fireside chat. He spoke with Steve Stoute, CEO of Translation, about navigating the most challenging of circumstances in pursuit of startup success.

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Where Are They Now? Carolina Garcia

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Meet Carolina Garcia, co-founder of Modabound, an online marketplace for college students to buy and sell fashion items. Along with co-founder Alexa Varsavsky, Carolina enrolled in GA’s Front-End Web Development course out of college, a year after they first launched Modabound. Carolina and Alexa are currently participating in the Techstars London accelerator program, with the goal of expanding to every college campus in America (and beyond!) Emily Lu, General Assembly

Name: Carolina Garcia (@modabound)
Occupation: Co-founder, Modabound

1. What inspired you to learn front-end web development? How has it helped you run your business?

We knew early on that starting a business as non-technical co-founders would be a challenge — we wanted to guide our developers better, and anticipated questions from investors down the road.

As co-founders with front-end skills, we are now able to project manage much more effectively. While we’re also able to contribute with code, the main benefit is being able to communicate our vision more clearly to our developers, having a better grasp of how long projects will take, and ultimately working more closely as a team.

2. What surprised you most about diving into web development?

I was surprised to learn how welcoming the developer community is. Developers love sharing. They talk a lot. They have boards. People are so open to helping each other out and solving problems together. We gained a great framework for understanding from GA’s Front-End Web Development Course, and from there I’ve been amazed by how much you can continue to learn by using the web as a resource.

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On Learning to Code, pt. 1

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I want to write about a topic that I think will benefit a lot of people: learning how to code. When I first quit my job to start my own company, all I had was an idea. The goal at that point was to find someone with a technical background to actually execute my idea. I suspect that many of you are in similar situations. There’s something you should know: it’s never going to happen.

Demand for developers has skyrocketed to unprecedented levels. Think about it. Anyone with any aspirations in the tech scene is starting their own company right now. Each of those startups needs its own lead developer (not to mention that companies like Facebook and Google are sucking up thousands of talented developers).

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