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Python: The Programming Language Everyone Needs to Learn

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What’s one thing that Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, will.i.am, Chris Bosh, Karlie Kloss, and I, a data science instructor at General Assembly, all have in common? We all think you should learn how to code.

There are countless reasons to learn how to code, even if you don’t want to become a full-time programmer:

  • Programming teaches you amazing problem-solving skills.
  • You’ll be better able to collaborate with engineers and developers if you can “speak their language.”
  • It enables you to help build the technologies of the future, including web applications, machine learning models, chatbots, and anything else you can imagine.

To most people, learning to program — or even choosing what language to learn — seems daunting. I’ll make it simple: Python is an excellent place to start.

Python is an immensely popular programming language commonly used by data analystsdata scientists, and software engineers. In addition to being one of the most popular — it’s used by companies like Google, SpaceX, and Instagram to do a huge variety different things including data cleaning, build AI models, building web apps, and more — Python stands out for being very simple to read and write, while offering extreme flexibility and having an active community.

Here’s a cool example of just how simple Python is: Here is code that tells the computer to print the words “Hello World”:

In Python:

print ("Hello World")

Yup, that’s really all it takes! For context, let’s compare that to another popular programming language, Java, which has a steeper learning curve (though is still a highly desirable skill set in the job market).

public class HelloWorld {   public static void main(String[] args) {      System.out.println("Hello, World");   } }

Clearly, Python requires much less code.

Experiencing Python in Everyday Life

Let’s talk about some of the ways in which Python is used today, including automating a process, building the functionality of an application, or delving into machine learning.

Here are some fascinating examples of how Python is shaping the world we live in:

  • Hollywood special effects: Remember that summer blockbuster with the huge explosions? A lot of companies, including Lucasfilm’s Industrial Light & Magic (ILM), use Python to help program those awesome special effects. By using Python, companies like ILM have been able to develop standard toolkits that they can reuse across productions, while still retaining the flexibility to build custom effects in less time than ever before.
  • File-sharing applications: When Dropbox was created in 2007, it used Python to build the desktop applications and server infrastructure responsible for actually sharing the files. After more than a decade, Python is still powering the company’s desktop applications. In other words, Dropbox was able to write a single application for both Macs and PCs that still works after more than a decade!
  • Web applications: Python is used to run various parts of some of today’s most popular websites, including Pinterest, Instagram, Spotify, and YouTube. In fact, Pinterest has used Python in some form since it was founded (e.g., to power its web app, build and maintain data pipelines, and perform analyses).
  • Artificial intelligence: Python is especially popular in the artificial intelligence community, again for its ease of use and flexibility. For example, in just a few hours, a business could build a basic chatbot that answers some of the most common questions from its customers. To do this, programmers could use Python to scrape the contents of all of the email exchanges with the company’s customers, identify common themes in these exchanges with visualizations, and then build a predictive model that can be used by the chatbot application to give appropriate responses.

Python at General Assembly

General Assembly focuses on building practical experience when learning new technical skills. We want students to walk away from our data science courses and bootcamps equipped to tackle the challenges they’re facing in their own lives and careers.

Python at General Assembly section, change the second graf to:

Many of our courses are designed to teach folks with limited exposure to Python to use it to answer real business questions. Dive into fundamental concepts and techniques, and build your own custom web or data application in our part-time Python Programming course. Or learn to leverage the language as part of our full-time Data Science Immersive program, part-time Data Science course, or a one-day Python bootcamp. Projects students have tackled include visualizing SAT scores from across the country, scraping data from public websites, identifying causes of airplane delays, and predicting Netflix ratings based on viewer sentiment and information from IMDB.

Ask a Question About Our Coding Programs

Meet Our Expert

Michael Larner is a passionate leader in the analytics space who specializes in using techniques like predictive modeling and machine learning to deliver data-driven impact. A Los Angeles native, he has spent the last decade consulting with hundreds of clients, including 50-plus Fortune 500 companies, to answer some of their most challenging business questions. Additionally, Michael empowers others to become successful analysts by leading trainings and workshops for corporate clients and universities, including General Assembly’s part-time Data Analytics course and SQL/Excel workshops in Los Angeles.

“GA provides an amazing community of colleagues, peers, and fellow learners that serve as a wonderful resource as you continue to build your career. GA exposes students to real-world analyses to gain practical experience.”

Michael Larner, Data Analytics Instructor, General Assembly Los Angeles

SQL: Using Data Science to Boost Business and Increase Efficiency

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In today’s digital age, we’re constantly bombarded with information about new apps, transformative technologies, and the latest and greatest artificial intelligence system. While these technologies may serve very different purposes in our life, all of them share one thing in common: They rely on data. More specifically, they all use databases to capture, store, retrieve, and aggregate data. This begs the question: How do we actually interact with databases to accomplish all of this? The answer: We use Structured Query Language, or SQL (pronounced “sequel” or “ess-que-el”).

Put simply, SQL is the language of data — it’s a programming language that enables us to efficiently create, alter, request, and aggregate data from those mysterious things called databases. It gives us the ability to make connections between different pieces of information, even when we’re dealing with huge data sets. Modern applications are able to use SQL to deliver really valuable pieces of information that would otherwise be difficult for humans to keep track of independently. In fact, pretty much every app that stores any sort of information uses a database. This ubiquity means that developers use SQL to log, record, alter, and present data within the application, while analysts use SQL to interrogate that same data set in order to find deeper insights.

Finding SQL in Everyday Life

Think about the last time you looked up the name of a movie on IMDB. I’ll bet you quickly noticed an actress on the cast list and thought something like, “I didn’t realize she was in that,” then clicked a link to read her bio. As you were navigating through that app, SQL was responsible for returning the information you “requested” each time you clicked a link. This sort of capability is something we’ve come to take for granted these days.

Let’s look at another example that truly is cutting-edge, this time at the intersection of local government and small business. Many metropolitan cities are supporting open data initiatives in which public data is made easily accessible through access to the databases that store this information. As an example, let’s look at Los Angeles building permit data, business listings, and census data.

Imagine you work at a real estate investment firm and are trying to find the next up-and-coming neighborhood. You could use SQL to combine the permit, business, and census data in order to identify areas that are undergoing a lot of construction, have high populations, and contain a relatively low number of businesses. This might be a great opportunity to purchase property in a soon-to-be thriving neighborhood! For the first time in history, it’s easy for a small business to leverage quantitative data from the government in order to make a highly informed business decision.

Leveraging SQL to Boost Your Business and Career

There are many ways to harness SQL’s power to supercharge your business and career, in marketing and sales roles, and beyond. Here are just a few:

  • Increase sales: A sales manager could use SQL to compare the performance of various lead-generation programs and double down on those that are working.
  • Track ads: A marketing manager responsible for understanding the efficacy of an ad campaign could use SQL to compare the increase in sales before and after running the ad.
  • Streamline processes: A business manager could use SQL to compare the resources used by various departments in order to determine which are operating efficiently.

SQL at General Assembly

At General Assembly, we know businesses are striving to transform their data from raw facts into actionable insights. The primary goal of our data analytics curriculum, from workshops to full-time courses, is to empower people to access this data in order to answer their own business questions in ways that were never possible before.

To accomplish this, we give students the opportunity to use SQL to explore real-world data such as Firefox usage statistics, Iowa liquor sales, or Zillow’s real estate prices. Our full-time Data Science Immersive and part-time Data Analytics courses help students build the analytical skills needed to turn the results of those queries into clear and effective business recommendations. On a more introductory level, after just a couple of hours of in one of our SQL workshops, students are able to query multiple data sets with millions of rows.

Ask a Question About Our Data Programs

Meet Our Expert

Michael Larner is a passionate leader in the analytics space who specializes in using techniques like predictive modeling and machine learning to deliver data-driven impact. A Los Angeles native, he has spent the last decade consulting with hundreds of clients, including 50-plus Fortune 500 companies, to answer some of their most challenging business questions. Additionally, Michael empowers others to become successful analysts by leading trainings and workshops for corporate clients and universities, including General Assembly’s part-time Data Analytics course and SQL/Excel workshops in Los Angeles.

“In today’s fast-paced, technology-driven world, data has never been more accessible. That makes it the perfect time — and incredibly important — to be a great data analyst.”

– Michael Larner, Data Analytics Instructor, General Assembly Los Angeles

How Data Maps Reveal Inequality and Equity in Atlanta

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Housing Map of Atlanta provided by Neighborhood Nexus.

Map of Atlanta provided by Neighborhood Nexus.

Mapping the communities of tomorrow requires a hard look at the topographies of today. Mike Carnathan, project director at Neighborhood Nexus, synthesizes big data into visual stories that chart the social, political, and economic conditions across the city of Atlanta. Part data miner, part cultural cartographer, Carnathan creates demographic maps that local leaders, advocates, and everyday citizens use to help understand and change their lives.

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Measuring What Matters: GA’s Approach to Measuring Student Outcomes

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General Assembly Measures Student Outcomes

General Assembly was founded on the principle that first and foremost, education is an investment. Students invest their time, money, and passions with us, and we have a duty to help them earn a return on that investment, both in the short and long run.

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How to Get a Job In Data: A Livestream with Fast Company

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YouTube-Thumbnail-FastCOmpany

We teamed up with Fast Company to host two of the leading minds in data, Claudia Perlich from Dstillery and Marc Maleh from R/GA, at our campus in New York City. Sarah Lawson, an assistant editor at Fast Company, moderated the discussion as they chatted about their everyday work with data, their favorite parts of the industry, and what it’s really like to work in data.

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7 Steps to Running an Effective A/B Test on Your Email Marketing

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Email marketing has grown to become of the most important components of an effective marketing strategy. Often cited as one of the most powerful marketing channels for a given company, email marketing can be used to achieve a variety of goals, such as growing your reach, educating your audience, generating sales leads, and converting those sales leads into customers. With such great potential for helping you achieve these numerous goals, email marketing should be one of your primary focuses as a marketer.

But it’s not enough to just be doing email marketing. You should also be constantly striving to optimize your email marketing to yield better and better results.

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Meaningful Data: Learnings From OKCupid

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Love is a difficult concept to grasp in general, but perhaps even more confusing once the internet becomes a factor. We search for meaning in signals or cues and try our hardest to gain insight into another person’s perspective. Is there a logical way to interpret someone else’s behavior in order to make smarter, more informed decisions moving forward? OK Cupid thinks so.

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