Social Impact Category Archives - General Assembly Blog | Page 4

GA is supporting children in Nepal—and we need your help!

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At General Assembly, we know the transformative power of education to change people’s lives for the better. And in light of the devastation from the recent earthquakes in Nepal, we are coming together to crowdfund support for relief efforts in the region, helping to build out much-needed educational facilities and shelters for children in the wake of the disaster. Continue reading

Bringing New Opportunity to the DC Community

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DC Innovation Opportunity Program partners at the event at GA’s campus

Today at our Washington, D.C. campus, we joined Mayor Muriel Bowser, 1776 and others to announce the DC Innovation Opportunity Program, to connect talented, low-income students with the resources, skills, and support they need to succeed in the careers of tomorrow. This exciting initiative is enabled with the support of partners such as the TDF Foundation, THEARC, Capital One, MedStar Health, and Microsoft.

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General Assembly Partners with Pledge 1% to Create a Community of Companies Driving Social Impact

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General Assembly is excited to announce a partnership with Pledge 1% and encourage your involvement. As part of General Assembly’s overall commitment to building a strong entrepreneurial ecosystem, General Assembly has built a relationship with Pledge 1% to help build stronger companies and stronger communities.

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Opportunity Fund Joins Campaign to End Youth Homelessness

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More than 2.5 million American youth experience homelessness every year, and among the many obstacles they face, access to job training and assistance in finding employment rank high on the list. Here at GA, we know the power that education can have to transform lives, which is why we are happy to announce that General Assembly’s Opportunity Fund is partnering with the Start from Here campaign to help raise awareness of these issues and participate in addressing employment challenges for economically disadvantaged young people.

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All-girls Hackathon Aims to Change the World for Women

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Students coding for change at IGNITE International Girls Hackathon in Oakland.

 

When I was awarded the Design For Change fellowship and officially became an Opportunity Fund fellow at General Assembly I felt a deep responsibility along with my excitement. One of the stipulations of the fellowship was to volunteer 100 hours in service to a local organization to teach youth some of the skills I learned in the User Experience Design Immersive.

I felt a responsibility to assist any young person with a similar background as me who wants to pursue a career in technology. I know how isolating it can be to feel under-represented in a field you desperately want to work in. The challenges to entering STEM careers can be discouraging to minority and/or female youth unless they have mentors who they can relate to.

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Coding For Change: Opportunity Fund Fellow Mentors All-Girl Hackathon

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Students coding for change at IGNITE International Girls Hackathon at General Assembly in NYC.

This past weekend, I attended my very first hackathon, the Ignite International Girls Hackathon at General Assembly. The event, part of IGNITE: Women Fueling Science and Technology, sets out to explore the roles of science and technology to advance gender equality in the tech field.

Unlike most first-time hackathon stories, I was not there to code myself.
Instead, I was there as a mentor for the event’s hackers—the incredible ladies of Girls Who Code. The global event called on girl hackers to help create websites or applications to identify, build, or increase access to safe spaces for women and girls—no easy feat.

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Opportunity Fund Expands With New Partners

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By now it’s clear that the technology industry is facing diversity issues. These issues are even more intriguing when you consider that by 2020, traditional universities will only provide enough qualified graduates to fill 30 percent of tech-related jobs. This is why we believe General Assembly’s own philanthropic fellowship program, Opportunity Fund, represents a tremendous chance to create real impact and change.

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Joining the White House to Expand Tech Skills Training

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General Assembly is honored to participate in President Obama’s Tech Hire initiative, which will provide a broader on-ramp to technology skills training. This cause is central to our mission of providing the greatest access to training in design, business and technology —to help people from any background find work they love. Just last week we announced an expansion of this commitment through our partnership with Capital One.

We are energized by the Administration’s bold plan and we look forward to working with them to achieve the goals we have set. The following is the commitment General Assembly has made, as outlined on the official White House Tech Hire site:

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Congratulations to Taproot, Winner of the 12 Days of Giving

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It was a fierce competition, but we’re thrilled to announce that the winner of our 12 Days of Giving holiday campaign was The Taproot Foundation, a non-profit that drives social change by bringing professional services to nonprofit organizations, pro bono. They’ve just launched Taproot+, a new online marketplace for pro bono, bringing together resources and interactive tools to give nonprofit professionals direct access to the marketing, HR, IT, and strategy services they need.

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The Year of Opportunity: A Look Back at 2014

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It’s no mystery that the tech industry’s predominantly white and Asian male workforce is in danger of alienating the increasingly diverse nation — and world — that forms its customer base. Less than a quarter of people employed in computer science- and engineering-related fields are women, and only 1 in 10 are minority women. African Americans make up less than 3% of all scientists and engineers, and Hispanics only 4%.

At the same time, startups and tech companies are witnessing a never-before-seen shortage of employable talent, and current estimates show that by 2020, traditional universities will only be producing enough qualified graduates to fill 30% of available tech-related jobs.

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